The 59th International Art Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia curated by Cecilia Alemani runs from April 23 to November 27, 2022 in Venice. Featuring 213 artists from 58 countries and over 1400 artworks and objects, the Exhibition focuses on the theme of human metamorphosis and our relationship with technology and the Earth.

In the context of Biennale Arte 2022, Orsoni’s iconic crucibles enrich the Venice Pavilion’s exhibition entitled “Alloro” (Laurel), which was chosen by the curator Giovanna Zabotti as “the symbol par excellence of metamorphosis”. As the Heart of the Furnace where glass and color are fused together at over 1300°C (2372°F) to give life to Orsoni’s unique materials, the crucible embodies metamorphosis through fire: the transformation of raw clay into a unique work of art, from a manufacturing tool that would have only two months of life into a timeless symbol of design.

The crucible therefore recalls the connection between human beings and nature and the importance of adopting practices that contribute to preserving our fragile environment like the reuse of raw materials. In the crucible, this concept takes concrete shape in the reuse of scrap glass to give life to new materials: an approach that Orsoni shares with its parent company TREND Group, which has always been committed to respecting and protecting the precious resources of our planet.

“The mission of the Venice Pavilion, since its foundation in 1932, is to give space to the artisan realities of Venice, so it was a natural choice for us to link Alloro to the historic Orsoni furnace – explained the curator of the Venice Pavilion Giovanna Zabotti -. In designing the exhibition, from the very first moment I envisioned the crucibles, which recall ancestral concepts, as cradles of our trees, a symbol of metamorphosis, of change and of new life. The collaboration with Orsoni was born over the years and conveyed in the magnificent artworks of this exhibition, which are the symbol of that kind of synergy that has made our city unique over the centuries”.

©Sebastiano Corrò